Luis Elizondo's Alleged Letter of Resignation Circulating on Social Media Could Mean Trouble for TTSA

 A copy of the letter circulating online.

A copy of the letter circulating online.

A letter of resignation allegedly submitted to the office of the Under Secretary of Defense by Luis Elizondo--former Department of Defense (DoD) intelligence officer and current To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science (TTSA) Director of Global Security and Special Programs--has been circulating recently on social media.

The letter, posted to a Twitter account that has only been active since last June, reportedly came from www.globalsecurityissues.com--the website of TTSA equity investor and advisor Chris Mellon. The website was taken down shortly following the release of the letter.

The portion of the letter that reads “the many accounts from the Navy and other services of unusual aerial systems interfering with military weapon platforms and displaying beyond-next-generation capabilities" was quoted in a New York Times article late last year, in which the quote was said to have come from Elizondo's resignation. This, along with witnesses coming forward to say they saw it on www.globalsecurityissues.com, have many wondering if the letter might be authentic.

Witnesses to Mellon's website are saying they saw the letter posted along with pictures of discs labelled "UNCLASSIFIED U.S. Government Property," slides from a Powerpoint presentation describing the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP), and a document including unredacted names and contact information for the pilots involved in the 2004 USS Nimitz UFO encounter.

 The reportedly unclassified discs.

The reportedly unclassified discs.

 A shipping label that appears to be addressed to Elizondo.

A shipping label that appears to be addressed to Elizondo.

If this truly is Elizondo's letter of resignation, then this could represent a major potential leak and a huge blow to TTSA; not because of the letter, Powerpoint presentation, or photographs of discs, but because the document containing personal information of the pilots involved in the 2004 USS Nimitz UFO encounter may also end up in the public domain--something that would not only damage TTSA's reputation, but could make further disclosure more difficult as witnesses lose trust in the public benefit corporation's ability to protect their privacy.

Tobias Wayland2 Comments