'World UFO Day' Comes Amidst Renewed Interest in Unidentified Aircraft

 An image from the now-famous 2004 Nimitz encounter off the coast of California.

An image from the now-famous 2004 Nimitz encounter off the coast of California.

World UFO Day 2018 has arrived amidst what some are hoping could be a new golden age for ufology. With recent admissions by United States government insiders that a $22 million secret program to study UFOs existed from 2007 to 2012, it seems that the subject is again being taken seriously by the mainstream.

The recent disclosure came as a result of Tom DeLonge's creation of To the Stars...Academy of Arts and Sciences--a public benefit corporation said to be composed of "a team of the most experienced, connected and passionately curious minds from the US intelligence community, including the CIA and Department of Defense." 

Former Department of Defense (DoD) intelligence officer Luis Elizondo resigned from the agency to join To the Stars..., after heading the government UFO program.

Elizondo resigned in October of 2017, and wrote in his resignation letter of the need for more serious attention to β€œthe many accounts from the Navy and other services of unusual aerial systems interfering with military weapon platforms and displaying beyond-next-generation capabilities.”

He was joined at To the Stars... by Harold E. Puthoff, an engineer who conducted research on extrasensory perception for the C.I.A. and later worked as a contractor for the UFO program, and Christopher K. Mellon, who was a deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence. 

So far, the public benefit corporation has released three government UFO videos, all of which were shot from the forward facing targeting cameras of U.S. fighter jets--two late last year, and a third in the first quarter of 2018. 

The films and subsequent testimony by those involved have garnered major attention from mainstream media sources, including the New York Times.

Now, with more releases promised in the future, and renewed media interest, many are saying that this could be the beginning of the disclosure that ufologists have sought for so long. 

And it just might result in a few more people looking to the sky during this World UFO Day.

Tobias WaylandComment